Archive for August, 2014

The job of jobhunting (2)

August 30, 2014

How do you spend your time when you are unemployed?  In a previous post,  I reviewed the conventional techniques (job listings, online bulletin boards, classified ads, a resume honed to perfection) that should occupy a portion of your day.

What about the academic tasks that can nudge you on your way to a more successful outcome than you have had before?

Please don’t make that immediate link between academic and going back to school.  I’m all for keeping your education current.  Finishing (or starting) that degree is great, but not a guaranteed ticket to success.

I’m thinking of academic in the sense of reading/studying/learning more about your chosen path.  Here are a few options:

  • websites of companies or associations you are drawn to,
  • YouTube segments of presentations by leaders you admire,
  • newspaper or journal articles,
  • books written by superstars in your field,
  • TV specials or documentaries about your area of interest.

Does academic suggest that you take notes?  I hope so!  You will need to remember a few impressive points you gleaned from your research. You could dedicate a special notebook or a file on your laptop to this targeted note-taking.

You will need these fresh ideas and facts to make sure your resume is relevant to the positions you seek.  And you will have wonderful nuggets to share in interviews.  Let your conversations reflect your learning.

An hour a day on academics will keep you informed and inspired as you go about your job search.  I invite any reader who has gained knowledge through research to share a suggestion or two about keeping up to date.

 

The Job of Jobhunting

August 29, 2014

If you are looking for work, what does your current workday look like?  How do you spend your time?

I want to suggest something I’ve learned after listening to hundreds of people who were searching.

Think about a combination of conventional, academiccreative, and social approaches.

 

What is the conventional element of the job search?

It is what you already know.  Job listings, employment services, headhunters, classified ads.  These conventional techniques have worked for a long time and they will continue to be effective.  Most people will acknowledge that they have gotten at least one job this way.  I know I have.  Find an ad that sort-of-kind-of matches your experience, submit a resume, and wait for a phone call. Sometimes it works.  So please continue to put some time into conventional job search techniques.  I’d suggest an hour or two a day at the most.

But wait!  It doesn’t always work, and it doesn’t always produce a great work opportunity for you.  I’ll be exploring other elements of the job search in the next few postings, so stay tuned.

Perspective on Pain

August 12, 2014

Who knew that a beloved actor and comedian was living with so much pain that he couldn’t take it any more?

Those in the inner circle of Robin Williams knew, cared, worried, and tried to help.

But the outer circle – that’s us, his fans and admirers – did not know beyond tabloid gossip.  We just wanted more of his gifts.

 

Is there a lesson for the rest of us?  I think of two things that can begin to make a tiny dent in the tragedy of Robin Williams:

  1. Draw closer to the suffering of people in mental pain.  They can be your colleagues, relatives, classmates, or neighbors. It’s the right thing to do, and you can do it to honor Williams.
  2. Never EVER take tomorrow for granted. A brilliant life ended at only 63 years.

 

Do you ever hear stats about recovery from depression?  Would these numbers offer hope for sufferers?  If not, where are the rainbow ribbons to wear to support mental health research?

About that federal job …

August 4, 2014

I just discovered a wonderful resource for those of you who are seeking federal employment.  You already know it is a daunting task.  So you will welcome yet another source of information and inspiration.

Do you know Karol Taylor and her work?  Karol is one of the nation’s experts in this subject, having worked in career development from within a government agency for many years.  Now, in what we laughingly call retirement, she has published two books (Guide to America’s Federal Jobs and Find Your Federal Job Fit, both published by Jist) , teaches, coaches, and speaks on the topic.  She writes and tells it like it is.

She is also a blogger, sharing her subject in bite-sized chunks.  Job seekers, you should follow this:  http://karoltaylor.wordpress.com.  You won’t be sorry.

Start by checking out the distinction between being eligible for the job and being qualified.  Who knew?